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  • Paleopikachu1212

    Project ideas

    March 31, 2016 by Paleopikachu1212

    I was thinking, I should make a project that isn't making a show to life or astrobiology. So, I'm either going to make a project called the Darwinian Isles about an alternate world with a new continent where animals from extinct times live and mix with present day ones, or I can make a project called the Forest about a land with infinite forests. It's up to you.

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  • Paleopikachu1212

    Update

    January 30, 2016 by Paleopikachu1212

    Ok, so right now I've been inactive for a while because I can't make up my mind. Here are some of the things I'm (possibly) planning to do.

    • scrap allogea and create a project about the future of earth
    • create an entirely new project that I'm not releasing the name to or anything about, but I think it'll be more sucessful than Allogea
    • do a project on scientific cryptids and mythical creatures
    • scrap allogea and create an alien planet project
    • Do all of them and keep allogea
    • join one of the projects already here
    • make my own wiki for the project
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  • LittleIslander

    Apparently Wikia has recently introduced a new level to categorizing templates: Template Types. I'm honestly not quite sure how useful this really is, but there's no reason for us not to use it. As such, I've went and categorized all of the templates. I won't really describe the system here, go read the linked post for that, or just go try it on a template page, it's very easy to understand. I'm just making a note here to remind everyone to always categorize a template after creating one, and if you can't/don't want to, ask me to do it.

    Also, a note for Marcello to deal with this.

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  • Dinosaurlover67

    Now, as you may see a group of reacurring crocodillians called the "Erectosuchians", and wondering what they are. Well, here's their general description.


    In the long run, I have a group of Crocodilians called the Erectosuchia (Meaning "Erect Crocodiles"- as a nod to Homo Erectus, who was the first human to propaly walk upright).


    They originated shortly after the last ice age, when most macropredatory mammals died off. They are descendant of the Cuvier's Dwarf Caiman (Paleosuchus Palpebrosus). They began to move on land more than water- as they sometimes already do, The Cuvier's Dwarf Caiman was not only the smallest crocodile of the modern day, but it was highly adaptable and on the least concern in the conservation status.It began to fill i…



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  • Special Agent Mulder

    These are some ideas for the species of fish that may evolve on Reef World.


    The Ginat Sea Lamprey evoloved from the smaller and much slower Sea Lamprey. When the continents were flooded many of the larger fish thrived letting them grow larger. To be able to keep up and survive the Sea Lamprey had to adapt. It became larger and gained sharper teeth to be able to get through the touh scales and produce blood faster. It also became more muscular and its back fin became slightly taller for more speed and agility. Now it is one of the top predators in the Reef World. Although it evolved in the Atlantic Ocean, it has started to travel farther and some small poulations have reached the Pacific. 

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  • Sayornis

    Books and Print Media


    Specific authors:
    -Dougal Dixon: The New Dinosaurs, After Man, Man After Man
    Dixon's post-human work for Omni magazine
    -Wayne Barlowe: Expedition, Inferno, Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe
    Unpublished sketches of future humans.
    -H. P. Lovecraft (various short stories and novellas)

    Future Evolution
    -H. G. Wells: The Time Machine (earliest portrayal of future human evolution?)
    -Kurt Vonnegut: Galapagos
    -Steven Baxter: Evolution
    -Colin Caket: Model A Monster-- a craft book that ends with a strange future-evolution tale
    -Bruce McClish and Ruth Berry: The Time-Traveller's Guide to Future Australia-- synopsis
    -Marc Boulay and Sebastian Steyer: Demain, Les Animaux du Futur

    Alternate evolution (including "speculative paleontology" and "lost world" sto…













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  • Dinosaurlover67

    So... yeah. Haven't been doing much posts on anything for the wiki recentely (Is there anything going on lately???), so I will just say, there will be a ton of new images, maps and descriptions (Hell, even chapters are going to be made once the place is done). So this is why I haven't been active alot: I've been doing alot of Drawings. They will come soon after one more drawing!

    Here's the link to my creature's:

    http://dinosaurlover83.deviantart.com/gallery/56596431/The-Long-Run

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  • Dinosaurlover67

    Are there any new projects going on asides from the current ones like WITAM, Dinosaurian Tertiary, Future of The World, etc.?

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  • Corvus coracis

    If you are in any way a contributor to this wiki, please read!!!

    Everyone is overcapitalizing. I've written on this issue before, but I want to bring it to people's attention again. Because this is the wiki, and not the forum, or anything else, and people can edit other people's pages, it should come as no surprise that it is expected that grammar is close to flawless. Now, I am dealing with this. But I don't like to waste my time dealing with this. So if everyone could just correct their own capitalization (and potentially other grammar) according to the previously linked blog post and also this, it would make it so much easier for me to deal with editing other people's projects.

    Also, I really don't like anonymous users on the wiki because…

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  • Paleopikachu1212

    Hallo!

    September 19, 2015 by Paleopikachu1212

    Ok, so I am new.



    I have a spec Evo I want to put on the wiki, and would like to know if I'm allowed to? It is similar in tone to sheather888's shetharia project.

    The name of the world is alloge coming from the Greek words allo(strange)and ge(earth)

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  • KaptainWombat

    Crocodiles today are famous for their amphibious habits, but only a few actually live in water more than a few metres deep. However, the largest and least endangered of the crocodiles, the indo-pacific saltwater crocodile, is one of the few that does go into salt water, and with that advantage over other crocodilians, it could form a new lineage of oceanic crocodiles. Hence, this concept.


    Pelagocrocodylus is a possible and potentially plausible descendant of the saltwater crocodile that lives in the Indo-Pacific oceanic zone in the coming 5 - 15 million years, and is almost totally marine, with the exception of coming to shore to lay eggs and occasionally bask. There are several species in the genus, all of which are able to tolerate salt w…


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  • Murphdog 05

    I'M BACK

    August 26, 2015 by Murphdog 05

    Sorry for my long period of absence, guys. It's just that my schedule was just so tight these past few weeks, and I couldn't get onto the wiki. But I'm back and ready to speculate!!!

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  • KaptainWombat

    This is a new group I have thought up for Future of The World, because it's kind of gone inactive again, and I think it needs a new spark.

    The group I have come up with are the Volgaraptoria, basically a collective group of mostly* small gubernators that are more like small birds than pterosaurs. Looking at the gubernatoroidea now, nearly all of the ones that are currently in the project are massive, with wingspans that are at least 6 metres. But looking at birds in real life, as well as pterosaurs, most species were/are not big, and most are actually really small. So it makes sense that the gubernatoroidea, being the next group of volant tetrapods, would follow a similar pattern of size. Hence, this blog post.

    The Volgaraptoria split off fr…

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  • Murphdog 05

    DeviantArt

    July 22, 2015 by Murphdog 05

    Today I got a Deviantart account and I posted my first picture: the Venomolo. You guys should go and check it out and maybe even get accounts of your own.

    murphdog05.deviantart.com

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  • Corvus coracis

    So, I've decided to start a blog over on the forum called Life, the Universe, and Everything. I stayed up for probably way too long last night finishing this, but anyway, it's already on the forum, here. I'm going to be writing about just a bunch of random stuff, whatever interests me. Here's my first post.

    So, like most of us, I love the Drake Equation, and it has its uses, but it also has its downsides. For example, we can calculate the rate of star formation in the galaxy, or even the percent of Earth-like planets orbiting stars, but ultimately, by the time we figure out any further factors the equation will be useless, because we will have already made contact. Another example. It doesn’t matter whether we happen to get the exact figure…

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  • AccurateLion

    This is a habitat I came up with for Borealia in "Future of the World"



    70 million years in the future, the Earth is warmer than it is today. The higher temperature means there are smaller ice caps, and with that, higher sea levels. This is most evident in South Africa where, with the higher sea levels combined with heavy rain have turned the plains into a vast mangrove swamp. Thus, the plants and animals have adapted to cope with their new habitat, whether it be becoming aquatic, amphibious, or living in the mangrove trees.




    Please rate in the comments section what you think.

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  • AccurateLion

    Another New Group

    June 27, 2015 by AccurateLion

    Thilastikoischia is a large order derived from modern day iguanas. Their name means "Mammal Hipped", because of their similar leg structure to mammals. They are a new group, having appeared in 65 Myf, but have diversified since then. Most are swift, fleet- footed herbivores, filling similar niches to deer and antelopes of the modern era. They are the most numerous herbivores in Borealia, being found all over the supercontinent, in various sizes and forms.






    Edit: I apologize if this seems rushed and, well, "not as good", as my other works. I only recently came up with this idea and I will continue on it in the future.

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  • AccurateLion

    Possible New Group

    June 20, 2015 by AccurateLion

    I wanted to bring to your attention a possible group that I came up with for the "Future of the World" project.

     

      Agkistrodon subtimalus, or simply the Crowned Striker, evolved into various species over the next few million years. This species becomes the ancestor of a new group called Maurosodontoidae, meaning "black tooth", because most species in this group have evolved black fangs. Maurosodontoidea becomes very diversified and develops into two new subfamilies; Makrysrynchosinae, meaning "long snout", and Syntomirynchosinae, meaning "short snout". These groups differ in size, build and niche; Members of Makrysrynchosinae are smaller and more agile, with the largest being 4 meters (13 feet long), and have teeth build for gripping and ho…

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  • LittleIslander

    Note that this is outdated. I leave here anyway, I guess. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    So, following a name change on the forum, I decided to change my username here at Wikia as well. However, I found that an account can only have their usernames changed once, and the change can't be reverted. Therefore, I've created another account, Melia Antiqua (Melia was taken), and given it my powers. Myotragus, logging out.

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  • LittleIslander

    Human Extinction

    February 3, 2015 by LittleIslander

    Ok, so I've come across a page at the old wiki that has potential. However, it needs a lot of work, so for now I'll have it as a WIP in a blog post. I'll work on it, and feel free to leave suggestions of drafts in the comments. Here's the page:


    Also see: Mass extinction


    Humans, just like any species, are not immortal. We have ways of predicting and avoiding the extinction of species, including ourselves, and perhaps someday ways to expand into the galaxy so wide we could never be wiped out, or at least our descendants. This is list of several proposed ways we could go extinct.

    • Metasability event: Chemical & physical laws change.
    • Global warming: Period of intense warming. As with Global climate change of any kind, a decrease in crop production …

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  • LittleIslander

    So I've gone through my admin stuff again today - first time this year. As should be obvious - this has beent the wiki's worst month so far. Anyway, I have few notices, some questions, and an article on community central for you guys to check out.

    Ok, so first, the deletion candidates. This time around:

    Ornithogeaea: Jagger's not currently active, and even then I beleive he discontinued it. Nobodies showed interest in taking it in, I say it's time to give it the axe.

    In The Future: I didn't even know we had this one. Made by AteTheCat, who seems to come one sometimes after long periods of not being around. It's another Advenatus situation. I say we axe this one without much consideration.

    What of Mars?: I understand WGP's intentions with this on…

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  • Corvus coracis

    Rhinoceros Trade

    January 29, 2015 by Corvus coracis

    Remember that time when Killerparrot said that the rhinoceros trade will have ended by this year? According to an article, from new year's day to about a week ago 49 rhinoceroses have been killed in South Africa. And last year was a record year in overall South African poaching, with 1215 killed. The insane thing is that back in 2007, we could have completely stopped this, with only 13 poached that year.

    I stumbled across this when looking for a science article to write a summary about for school. I chose it, wrote the summary, and was amazed at how little we're doing to fix this huge problem. For comparison, there were 17,000 white rhinos at the end of 2007, leaving one to believe it has declined to between 15,000 and 16,000.

    Oh, yeah, and …

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  • KaptainWombat

    Today, the Mediterranean is an almost landlocked ocean basin, the last large remnant of the Tethys Ocean. But several million years ago, it was a toxic lake of salt more than 2 km below sea level, where only brine flies and microbes could live long term. But this was not to last, some 100,000 years after it was first isolated, the entire basin was flooded in only a few years when the Atlantic broke through at Gibraltar, in a flood that is believed to have been one of the largest in the earths history. But as Africa continues to slowly move northwards, it seems inevitable that this will happen again.

    In some 6 million years time, at the height of the 'EPIA' (Early Postocene Ice Age) the combination of low sea levels and the closing of the Gi…

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  • LittleIslander

    So, if you've been on my profile recently, or have checked out this topic of the forum, then my idea of falculatively bipedal dimorphodonts is nothing new to you. But I never actually explained it in depth. I had plan to start this blog post series anyway, so here's my explanation of (semi-)bipedal pterosaurs.

    Also, this, and most further concepts done in this blog post series are about concepts, not application, so I won't talk about any scenario's to do with this, simply how the evolution and bauplan could work.

    Firstly, I'll describe the basic concept. In an alternate Jurassic, dimorphodonts start running on their hind legs when sprinting. Otherwise, they walk on all fours, but running frees the hands to grab prey. This allows them to gro…

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  • Corvus coracis

    Plans for the Future

    December 12, 2014 by Corvus coracis

    Okay, guys, so I haven't been on in like two or three days and even though I though I was done with the homework overload for December, sure enough, two weeks later, I'm over my head with weekend homework. Even more, by next Friday, I'll have had around six concerts within a week, so that certainly doesn't help me schedule. I'm not sure if any of you are aware of this, but even though I do no sports, and I don't chat with friends or anything, I still practice piano nearly every day, play violin and piano at school, go to school most days at 7:10 for the jazz band, and have plenty of concerts around this time of year.

    Anyway, I won't be in the competition, and probably not adding content until winter break. Even though that's only a week awa…

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  • LittleIslander

    As some of you may know, I check in on the old wiki every once and awhile to see if anyone replied anything worthwhile. Today's visit came up with nothing but continued trolling. However, I has surprised upon searching "Speculative Evolution Wiki" to find our wiki as the second result.

    Previously, you could go a few pages (and realistically, nobody actually goes past the first page) and still not find us. I don't know how far back you had to go (or if we appeared at all), but nobody was getting here directly. However, with this, more people are actually going to find this place now.

    This will mean new members. But beware. The trolls will find us now to. You know what happened on the old wiki, and what it has become - trolls spam it to this d…

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  • MagneticHyena

    Resigning from the Wiki

    November 21, 2014 by MagneticHyena

    A message to all members of the wiki.

    For the past several months, the speculative evolution community on wikia had rifted and torn itself apart due to pointless, over exaggerated drama that has led to the creation of two separate wikis that I've look at in disgust, having 'loved' the themes and ideas of speculative evolution since discovering it in 2010.

    Nevertheless, as a founding member of this new wiki following the break from the original (I had undoubtedly aided in the split), I felt that it was in the interest of the members and a future community to help build this new wiki into something more palatable to all users. Of course, being the person I am, with the level of school and public work that I have to involve myself in, I've comm…

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  • Corvus coracis

    Many times before, I've seen things that are neither proper nouns nor genera or clades of higher ranks capitalised in names of organisms. While this is gone over comprehensively in the Manual of Style, I will clarify the grammar conventions as not to have to correct them.

    Historically, I've seen this mostly with KaptainWombat, but with Myotragus' work on Old World Monkeys (Project Future), Whanggoldpaw exhibiting the same issue on Australia (New Pleistocene), and me having to correct all of this, I am going to have to note the rules. Here's a list of what to do, and what not to do.

    1. Always capitalise the first word in a title or section heading. All other words should be capitalised except for prepositions (to, for, with, etc.) and articles (the…
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  • LittleIslander

    Just a few quicks notes. After going through a few things about a week ago, I cam across a few pages I'm not sure what to do with. So it's time to go through the garbage and do a community trash day.

    Advenatus: We can't keep projects by innactive members or small projects not being updated. Advenatus fits under both. We can't have it laying around, so I say we do away with it.

    Animula and Thalassa: Now, I'm not saying they're not good content. But both appear to be innactive. I won't go either way, so we'll see what the consensus is.

    Ryū No Toge No Shima: It's another Advenatus. I don't want to give up on it yet, but it doesn't look good for this projects future.

    Pongolese and Chimpan (Novellus): We can't just have two random creatures from a pot…

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  • LittleIslander

    The Storm is Coming

    November 7, 2014 by LittleIslander

    Ok, so Wikia has a stupid new nav that nobody likes that's going to be Wikia wide soon, and it's not allowed to be customizable. See here. And READ THE COMMENTS. And pitch in in the debate against this feature.

    Screw Wikia.

    This is going to mess with our theme. The white in the wallpaper or whatever it's called (darwin and the chimp) is already to much, but this will  make it just all white with a hint of green. I'm going to start going insane if this wiki gets any whiter.

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  • Corvus coracis

    The causes of three largest mass extinctions in history appear to be evident. Ordovician–Silurian: glaciation. Permian–Triassic: Siberian Traps. Cretaceous–Palaeogene: Chicxulub asteroid impact. The truth is likely much more complex, but new theories are revealing the answers to what really caused a near demise of life on Earth on three occasions.


    The diagram to the right will prove very useful to uncovering the complex relationships of mass extinction causes. Two new theories are particularly of interest, the first of which is a gamma ray burst causing the Ordovician–Silurian extinction. While a well-known glaciation is the apparent cause of the second largest extinction of all time, this seems far too benign to wipe out 80% of life on Ear…


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  • LittleIslander

    The Future of Sumatra

    September 7, 2014 by LittleIslander

    Short story short I started this project on the forums. However, it's presented in story like fashion, from the perspective of a human, and having pages just wouldn't work at all. So this is going to be a forum only project. However, I figured I'd at least post the intro over here as a blog post, hence you reading this. And yes, I realize the first part is way to long and mostly unecesary.


    It's a normal day in lab. Well, except for the looming excitement of the discovery of a potential new species. Tessa Gallant, a student studying Field Biology, and with an interest in Parasitology. On vacation in Kenya, she came across an odd Duiker Carcass, and decided to take it back to perform a necropsy. It was obvious from the start it died from a pa…

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  • Jurassic Park Treasury

    Here are some original ideas for alternative evolution projects that I have not seen. These could help anyone who is struggling to come up with a project.

    - Eocene ice age.

    - Triassic ice age.

    - Jurassic ice age.

    - Carboniferous ice age.

    - Worse P-Tr extinction.

    - No Pliocene/Pleistocene ice ages.

    - Crocodylomorph-dominated Cenozoic.

    - Carnosaurs as dominant predators in no K-T projects.

    - Terrestrial Pakicetus descendants as dominant predators.

    - Primate-dominated island.

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  • KaptainWombat

    Halilycosauria

    August 26, 2014 by KaptainWombat

    This is so I can preserve it. The competition entry can be deleted.KaptainWombat (talk) 10:18, August 26, 2014 (UTC)

    Ever since the Triassic, when the first ichthyosaurs and sauropterygians set foot in the water, the seas have been the domain of the tetraopds. These early marine reptiles greately diversified and with few interruptions they persisted until the end of the cretaceous, when they were themselves the victim of a mass extinction. After this event, the mammals took over this role, and the whales, seals, sirenians and otters, amongst several extinct groups, have largely dominated the seas since then.

    The reptiles and birds still, however, exist in the seas in relative abundance, the birds as a variety of flightless and volant seabird…

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  • Corvus coracis

    So, I thinking we could leave a one or two week break between comps on this wiki. Because some of us (mostly me) have been working on comps far more than projects. Anyway, after the comp, I'm going to have a "grand reopening" of one of my projects. My options and ideas are:

    • Finishing reworking the Quintenary for The Fate of the Earth;
    • Speedily typing, quickly releasing content for Terra Chordata;
    • Getting all of the groups worked out for Eocene Split; and
    • Redoing Vendoarchia completely (including probably renaming it), and having semiaquatic ice-loving jellyfish that slide around on their tentacles in a snowball Earth world (the split happens at the end of the Cryogenian).

    Anyway, I can't really decide which to do, so I'm going to have a poll. F…

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  • Corvus coracis

    This is the development page for my forum competition entry.

    Neornithes, the only surviving branch of the dinosaurs, are represented by two major clades, Neognathae and Palaeognathae. The Neognathae are represented by 10,000 species, one of the mosts diverse groups of tetrapods. The Palaeognathae, on the other hand, are represented by only 59 species, and are absent in Eurasia, North America, and Antarctica. This lopsided diversity appears to be a result of the flightlessness or near-flightlessness of all palaeognath species, the ratites convergently evolving flightlessness six or more times, likely due to the near-uselessness of the flight abilities found in the other palaeognaths, tinamous, which the ancestors of ratites likely had.

    Strang…

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  • KaptainWombat

    Declinozoic

    August 11, 2014 by KaptainWombat

    This is not a project, but an idea I had ~KaptainWombat

    In the world we live in, the mammals are dominant, and have been since the end of the cretaceous, when non-avian dinosaurs went extinct. Reptiles are still very much presant, and still soldier on as the crocodilians and squamates, with the tuatara of New Zealand representing a third group. But suppose that one other group of reptiles evolved in the mesozoic, and persisted to the presant? These reptiles are new, different, and have one highly distinctive feature. Living on most continents, in the sea, and even in the air, they have made this world quite different from the familiar cenozoic.


    The Declinozoic is in most ways the same as the Cenozoic we're used to, with the megafauna being m…


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  • LittleIslander

    Caudaspondyli

    August 11, 2014 by LittleIslander

    Insular magic. An informal term that generally refers to how odd insular taxa are compared to their relatives. Whether because the envrionmental restrictions and potentials, or the lack of competition, the islands themselves drive their castaways to become some of the most unqiue vertebrates alive today. Darwin's finches, the flightless kakapo, the giant extinct Nuralagus, the ectothermic Myotragus; these are just some highlights among many, many of such taxa. The Caudaspondyli, are another.

    Endemic to volcanic islands off the coast of mainland Europe, the Conni islands have very little in mammal divesity. Instead, birds and reptiles have dominated the archipelago. One of the major small herbivorous groups are the Caudaspondyli, or neckless l…

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  • LittleIslander

    Archaeospondyli

    August 10, 2014 by LittleIslander

    The Amphbians. A paraphyletic group of tetrapods, and one of the four traditional tetrapod classes. The lissamphibia is very diverse today, if on the decline. And it's fairly complete, with only one of the four subgroups not surviving to the present. But look back further. The lissamphbians appeared in the late permian, and amphibians go much farther back then that. To the devonian. Looking back, you have the "Ichthyostegalians", on to forms like the throwback Cassigyrinus, among others. From there you find the Temnospondyls, and the Lepospondyls. One of the latter groups lives on in the aforementioned Lissamphbia, but which is not known. Beyond that you have the various non-amniote antracosaurs, such as the Seymouriamorphs, and Diadectomor…

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  • LittleIslander

    So, we've recently added Concavenator's various pages, and I would like to bring up again whether or not to just have member projects. Could we have, say, a Future is Wild page, but none for the animals? We could have a template for official projects. Just an idea.

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  • LittleIslander

    Check this out. Sapient sarupods FTW.

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  • LittleIslander

    You guys need to understand the concept of copyright. You can't just find random images off google or any site without knowing the copyright of it. Many image shave liscencing, and can only be used or modified with mention of the original offer, and credit/copyright going to them. In some cases you even need direct permission from the author. I've also seen it done, mostly by Marcello, that one will Modify an image from the original, then set liscencing to Created by the one who posted it. Modified images have copyright that go to the author of the original, NOT the modifier. Also, for those that draw, in some cases basing off something can even count as breaking copyright, even stuff like technical drawings along the lines of Skeletals (*…

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  • LittleIslander

    Note, this deals with cancelled projects.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I won't be starting these project just yet, but here is a preview of what is to come.

    Arterra: We are tetrapods. Our pets are tetrapods. So are our game, and pack animals. Our ancestors have been tetrapods for millions of years. Put pets, are arthropods. The bloodsuckers. The web-weavers. The mound builders. They are small, we are big. But say that time didn't allow this slip. After all, the arthropods were first to get on land. They were giants until the end of the carboniferous. But then it all went wrong. Synapsids took over. Then the dinosaurs evolved. Many a gro…

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  • Harekiller

    Non-carbon Life

    June 20, 2014 by Harekiller

    Not silicon either, because that gets old, and actually doesn't have all that much potential.

    I quote wikipedia: "

    • Boron's chemistry is possibly even more variable than that of carbon,[citation needed] since it has the ability to form polyhedral clusters and three-center two-electron bonds. Boranes are dangerously explosive in Earth's atmosphere, but would be more stable in a reducing environment. However, boron's low cosmic abundance makes it less likely as a base for life than carbon.
    • Various metals, together with oxygen, can form very complex and thermally stable structures rivaling those of organic compounds;[citation needed] the heteropoly acids are one such family. Some metal oxides are also similar to carbon in their ability to form bo…
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  • LittleIslander

    I highly recomend all of you make accounts at the spec evo forums. All of you, particularly Marcello, Cryptile, Whang, could use the constructive criticism that you'll get. As for KaptainWombat and MHyaena, I can imagine that your projects would be relatively well reveived over there, thought suggestions and a wider audience can't hurt. I'm sure KW could appreciate getting a WiTAM comment that isn't from me ;).

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  • Corvus coracis

    The comment section below is an archived discussion, please do no edit it. Start a new discussion should continuing be necesary. ~~Myotragus


    Global warming: everyone talks about it, everyone believes it. But have you ever stopped to consider the facts? I am about to squash the theory of man made global warming without a doubt, and without a single disagreement.

    So, here is a summary of the theory of global warming. It states that after the industrial revolution, humans have caused an increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This carbon dioxide has caused temperatures to rise since the 19th century, and is melting the Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets. This is based on a number of true facts. These are: carbon dioxide levels h…

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  • Harekiller

    You guys know about entropy and the heat death of the universe? Depressing stuff.

    Anyways, if you don't, you know how, according to the second law of thermodynamics, heat energy will always spread to where there is less of it. For example, if you put a blast of hot air in a box of cold air, the temperature in that box will eventually reach an equilibrium. Heat energy transmits in three ways: conduction, wherein it passes through solid objects; convection, wherein the heat source heats some air whcih rises out of the way, exposing more cold air to heat, which rises out of the way, getting displaced by more cold air (to give an example); and radiation, whereupon the heat energy results in kinetic energy of particles (including light), which s…

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  • LittleIslander

    As I've said before, I think there are indeed distinct advantages to having a new start. One of these is competitions, and better preperation for a larger community in the future, with the old members being admins and such. However, there are a few things we can to to a) make the wiki better, and b) not fall into the same traps as the old site.

    The first of these is the Admin Task Roles system. Instead of us all simply doing the same things with the same powers, we each have roles. Although many roles would have multiple admins, not all admins do a role. This creates variation, organisation, and a professional feel to the wiki. Some of these roles include:

    • Acting as Chat Mod
    • Article Quality rating (Similar to Wikipedia system.)
    • Competition mod…
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  • LittleIslander

    Ibexgod, Reborn!

    June 18, 2014 by LittleIslander

    Finally have an account again. And I can write blog posts! They are really more useful then you may think.

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  • JaggerButtermilk

    Badges

    June 17, 2014 by JaggerButtermilk

    Maybe we could have our own additional "badges" for certain achievements. Here's some ideas. 

    • Solar System Badge -- You have 1000 edits
    • Planet Badge -- You have 500 edits.
    • Rainforest Badge -- You have 200 edits.
    • Wetlands Badge -- You have 100 edits.
    • Grasslands Badge -- You have 20 edits. 

    That's really the basic idea. 

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